How To Get Results


If nothing changes, then nothing changes. You cannot hit snooze, stop to grab fast food on the way to work, eat it while driving, and expect to lose weight. You can make a change and wake up 10 minutes earlier and eat some fruit for breakfast, however.

Courtesy of Ketut Subiyanto

You simply cannot do the same thing over and over and expect your life to change. Of course, life isn’t as simple as a series of inputs and outputs, but often enough, you get out what you put in.

Focus On The Process, Not On Results.

Results are downstream from a process, so having your focus on the results can result in neglecting the process. Of course, the process may not produce the intended results, but you can make adjustments to the process until you get the results you want.

Change Your Behavior.

If nothing changes, then nothing changes. You cannot hit snooze on your alarm, stop to grab fast food on the way to work, eat it while driving, and expect to lose weight. You can make a change and wake up 10 minutes earlier and eat some fruit for breakfast, however.

You might think that one little change won’t make much of a difference. And you’d be right. But it’s better than NO change at all. And several small changes similar to this one have a way of compounding over time. You might take the stairs instead of the elevator, park further away, and get up from your desk for ten minutes every hour and go for a short walk.

All of those small changes, in tandem, can and will work together to create change.

Adjust If Necessary.

Suppose you’re trying to lose weight and you have a certain calorie budget. Stick to that budget long enough to determine if it is producing results. Be as routine as possible with exercise and movement so as to establish a baseline. Make small, incremental adjustments where an adjustment is needed.

What might be even more important here is noticing what behaviors allowed you to stick to that calorie budget and get that exercise. If you decided you would wake up 30 minutes earlier than usual and go for a walk, understand that the decision to wake up 30 minutes earlier allowed you to take that walk. You might notice you need more or less time. Fine. Adjust if necessary.

Again, results are downstream from a process, and one choice begets another choice. If you decide to hit snooze and oversleep, you’ll end up grabbing fast food.

Whenever possible, avoid creating those “fast food problems” for yourself. Remember, small choices tend to compound. A fast food problem is a compounded problem.